User Tools

Site Tools


Action disabled: recent
translating:blog:2015-02-03-073705

Art for Heart’s sake (перевод)

<spoiler|исходный текст> <poem> Art for Heart’s sake “Here, take your pineapple juice,” gently persuaded Koppel, the male nurse. “Nope!” grunted Collis P.Ellsworth. “But it's good for you, sir.” “Nope!” “It's doctor's orders.” “Nope!” Koppel heard the front door bell and was glad to leave the room. He found Doctor Caswell in the hall downstairs. “I can't do a thing with him,” he told the doctor. “He won’t take his pineapple juice. He doesn't want me to read to him. He hates the radio. He doesn't like anything!”

Doctor Caswell received the information with his usual professional calm. He had done some constructive thinking since his last visit. This was no ordinary case. The old gentleman was in pretty good shape for a man of seventy-six. But he had to be kept from buying things. He had suffered his last heart attack after his disastrous purchase of that jerkwater railroad out in Iowa. All his purchases of recent years had to be liquidated at a great sacrifice both to his health and his pocketbook.

The doctor drew up a chair and sat down close to the old man. “I've got a proposition for you,” he said quietly. Old Ellsworth looked suspiciously over his spectacles. “How'd you like to take up art?” The doctor had his stethoscope ready in case the abruptness of the suggestion proved too much for the patient's heart. But the old gentleman's answer was a vigorous “Rot!” “I don't mean seriously,” said the doctor, relieved that disaster had been averted [ə'vɜːt]. “Just fool around with chalk and crayons. It'll be fun.” “Bosh!” “All right.” The doctor stood up. “I just suggested it, that's all.” “But, Caswell, how do I start playing with the chalk — that is, if I'm foolish enough to start?” “I've thought of that, too. I can get a student from one of the art schools to come here once a week and show you.”

Doctor Caswell went to his friend, Judson Livingston, head of the Atlantic Art Institute, and explained the situation. Livingston had just the young man — Frank Swain, eighteen years old and a promising student. He needed the money. Ran an elevator at night to pay tuition. How much would he get? Five dollars a visit. Fine. Next afternoon young Swain was shown into the big living room. Collis P. Ellsworth looked at him appraisingly. “Sir, I'm not an artist yet,” answered the young man. “Umph?” Swain arranged some paper and crayons on the table. “Let's try and draw that vase over there on the mantelpiece,” he suggested. “Try it, Mister Ellsworth, please.” “Umph!” The old man took a piece of crayon in a shaky hand and made a scrawl. He made another scrawl and connected the two with a couple of crude lines. “There it is, young man,” he snapped with a grunt of satisfaction. “Such foolishness. Poppycock!” Frank Swain was patient. He needed the five dollars. “If you want to draw you will have to look at what you're drawing, sir.”

Old Ellsworth squinted and looked. “By gum, it's kinda pretty, I never noticed it before.”

When the art student came the following week there was a drawing on the table that had a slight resemblance to the vase. The wrinkles deepened at the corners of the old gentleman's eyes as he asked elfishly, “Well, what do you think of it?” “Not bad, sir,” answered Swain. “But it's a bit lopsided.”

“By gum,” Old Ellsworth chuckled. “I see. The halves don't match.” He added a few lines with a palsied hand and colored the open spaces blue like a child playing with a picture book. Then he looked towards the door. “Listen, young man,” he whispered, “I want to ask you something before old pineapple juice comes back.” “Yes, sir,” responded Swain respectively. “I was thinking could you spare the time to come twice a week or perhaps three times?” “Sure, Mister Ellsworth.” “Good. Let's make it Monday, Wednesday and Friday. Four o'clock.”

As the weeks went by Swain's visits grew more frequent. He brought the old man a box of water-colors and some tubes of oils. When Doctor Caswell called Ellsworth would talk about the graceful lines of the andirons ['ændaɪən]. He would dwell on the rich variety of color in a bowl of fruit. He proudly displayed the variegated ['veərɪgeɪtɪd] smears of paint on his heavy silk dressing gown. He would not allow his valet to send it to the cleaner's. He wanted to show the doctor how hard he'd been working. The treatment was working perfectly. No more trips downtown to become involved in purchases of enterprises of doubtful solvency.

The doctor thought it safe to allow Ellsworth to visit the Metropolitan, the Museum of Modern Art and other exhibits with Swain. An entirely new world opened up its charming mysteries. The old man displayed an insatiable curiosity about the galleries and the painters who exhibited in them. How were the galleries run? Who selected the canvases for the exhibitions? An idea was forming in his brain. When the late spring sun began to cloak the fields and gardens with color, Ellsworth executed a god-awful smudge which he called “Trees Dressed in White”. Then he made a startling announcement. He was going to exhibit it in the Summer show at the Lathrop Gallery!

For the Summer show at the Lathrop Gallery was the biggest art exhibit of the year in quality, if not in size. The lifetime dream of every mature artist in the United States was a Lathrop prize. Upon this distinguished group Ellsworth was going to foist his “Trees Dressed in White”, which resembled a gob of salad dressing thrown violently up against the side of a house! “If the papers get hold of this, Mister Ellsworth will become a laughing-stock. We've got to stop him,” groaned Koppel. “No,“ admonished the doctor. “We can't interfere with him now and take a chance of spoiling all the good work that we've accomplished.” To the utter astonishment of all three — and especially Swain — “Trees Dressed in White” was accepted for the Lathrop show.

Fortunately, the painting was hung in an inconspicuous [ˌɪnkən'spɪkjuəs] place where it could not excite any noticeable comment. Young Swain sneaked into the Gallery one afternoon and blushed to the top of his ears when he saw “Trees Dressed in White”, a loud, raucous ['rɔːkəs] splash on the wall. As two giggling students stopped before the strange anomaly Swain fled in terror. He could not bear to hear what they had to say. During the course of the exhibition the old man kept on taking his lessons, seldom mentioning his entry in the exhibit. He was unusually cheerful.

Two days before the close of the exhibition a special messenger brought a long official-looking envelope to Mister Ellsworth while Swain, Koppel and the doctor were in the room. “Read it to me,” requested the old man. “My eyes are tired from painting.” “It gives the Lathrop Gallery pleasure to announce that the First Landscape Prize of $1,000 has been awarded to Collis P.Ellsworth - for his painting, “Trees Dressed in White”.” Swain and Koppel uttered a series of inarticulate gurgles. Doctor Caswell, exercising his professional self-control with a supreme effort, said: “Congratulations, Mister Ellsworth. Fine, fine … See, see … Of course, I didn't expect such great news. But, but — well, now, you'll have to admit that art is much more satisfying than business.” “Art's nothing,” snapped the old man. “I bought the Lathrop Gallery last month.”

</poem> </spoiler>

<spoiler|перевод> <poem> Искусство как лекарство

— Пожалуйста, выпейте ваш ананасовый сок, — мягко настаивал Коппел, камердинер мистера Колиса П. Элсуорта. — Не-a! — буркнул тот в ответ. — Но это полезно для вас, сэр. — Не-a! — Так доктор же прописал! — Не-a! Коппел услышал звонок в прихожей и был рад покинуть комнату. В коридоре у лестницы стоял Доктор Касвел. — Прямо не знаю, что с ним делать, — пожаловался он доктору, — Не пьёт ананасовый сок и всё тут! Не хочет, чтобы я ему читал. Ненавидит радио. Ничего ему не нравится! Доктор Касвел выслушал жалобы Коппела, сохраняя привычное профессиональное спокойствие. Со времени последнего визита он только и думал об этом случае. А случай был действительно незаурядный. Для своих шестидесяти семи лет старик был довольно бодрым, хотя и перенёс очередной инфаркт из-за приобретения совершенно убыточной железной дороге где-то в захолустье Айовы. Теперь, ради сохранения его здоровья и капитала, нужно было, чтобы он расстался со всеми своими приобретениями последних лет, да и вообще больше не занимался коммерцией. Доктор сел в кресло, придвинув его поближе к старику: — У меня есть предложение для вас, — сказал он вкрадчиво. Мр. Элсуорд подозрительно сверкнул глазами из-под очков. Держа стетоскоп наготове и опасаясь приступа, который мог произойти из-за необычного предложения, доктор спросил: — А как насчёт живописи? — Вздор! — ответил старик, не задумываясь. Поняв, что его опасения были напрасны, доктор продолжил: — Ну… ни как настоящий художник. Только немного порисовать … Мелками, карандашами. Будет интересно! — Бред! — Ладно,— доктор встал, — Это всего лишь предложение. — Но, Касвел, как же мне порисовать-то, если я и карандаш-то в руке держать не умею? — Я об этом позаботился. Найму студента из какой-нибудь художественной школы, чтобы он приходил раз в неделю и показывал вам, как это делается. Доктор Кесвел обратился за помощью к своему другу Джудсону Ливингстону, который возглавлял Атлантический Художественный Институт. Ливингстон как раз имел на примете молодого студента, которого звали Фрэнк Свэйн. Ему было восемнадцать, он был талантлив, но небогат и вынужден был по вечерам работать лифтёром, чтобы оплачивать учёбу. Сколько же ему платить? Пять долларов за визит. Отлично. На следующий день, после полудня, в просторную гостиную вошёл Свэйн. В ответ на пытливый взгляд Элсуорта, молодой человек предупредил: — Сэр, я ещё не настоящий художник. — Hу и? Свэйн выложил на стол несколько листков бумаги, мелки и предложил: — Давайте попробуем нарисовать вон ту вазу на каминной полке. Попробуйте, мистер Элсуорд, будьте добры. — Хм… Старик, трясущейся рукой, взял мелок и нарисовал кривую линию. Затем ещё одну и соединил их парой небрежных отрезков. — Получите, молодой человек, — буркнул он, с ноткой удовлетворёния в голосе, – Глупость какая-то. Ерунда! Фрэнк Свэйн был терпелив. Он не хотел терять пять долларов. — Если вы хотите рисовать, вам нужно смотреть на то, что вы рисуете, сэр. Старик Элсуорт поднял глаза и пригляделся: — Бог мой! Она прекрасна, я никогда не замечал этого раньше. Когда молодой художник пришёл на следующей неделе, на столе лежал рисунок, слегка напоминающий вазу. Старик довольно прищурился и с ожиданием спросил: — Ну. Что вы думаете об этом? — Неплохо сэр, - ответил Свэйн, - Но она чуть-чуть кривовата. — Бог мой! — воскликнул старик, — Я вижу. Половины не равны. Он, трясущейся рукой, добавил несколько линий и, совсем как ребёнок в книжке-раскраске, закрасил всё пустое пространство синим цветом. Затем он, наблюдая за дверью, прошептал: — Послушайте, молодой человек, я хочу спросить вас кое о чём до того как этот старый любитель ананасового сока вернётся. — Да, сэр, - ответил Свэйн почтительно. —Я тут подумал… не могли бы вы уделять мне время дважды, или возможно, трижды в неделю? —Конечно, Мистер Элсуорт. —Отлично. Тогда приходите по понедельникам, средам и пятницам. В четыре часа. Шли недели, Свэйн теперь приходил чаще. Он принёс старику коробку акварели и тюбики с масляной краской. Всякий раз, когда звонил доктор Кесвел, Элсуорт заводил разговор об изящных линиях каминной подставки для дров или подробно останавливался на богатом разнообразии красок блюда с фруктами. Вдобавок, подтверждая своё усердие, Элсуорт гордо демонстрировал доктору разноцветные пятна краски на своём дорогом шёлковом халате, не позволяя слуге отослать его в прачечную. Выбранный метод лечения оказался результативен. Поездки в деловой центр города с сопутствующей им покупкой близких к банкротству компаний полностью прекратились.

Элсуорт, с позволения доктора и в компании Свэйна, мог теперь посещать Метрополитен, Музей современного искусства и другие выставки. Совершенно новый мир открыл ему свои чарующие тайны. Старик проявлял жадную любознательность ко всему, что касалось галерей и художников, чьи картины выставлялись в них. Как эти галереи работают? Кто выбирает полотна для выставок? Новая идея рождалась в его голове. В то время, когда поля и сады окрасились лучами запоздалого весеннего солнца, Элсуорт намалевал безобразную кляксу, которую назвал «Деревья в белом», и сделал потрясшее всех заявление. Он собирался выставить свой рисунок на Летнем шоу в галерее Латроп! Ежегодное Летнее шоу в галерее Латроп было самой уважаемой художественной выставкой, хотя и не самой крупной, а получить приз галереи – было заветной мечтой любого профессионального художника Соединённых Штатов. И этой прославленной публике Элсуорт собирался навязать свою картину «Деревья в белом», напоминающую комок соуса для салата, размазанный о стену дома! — Если газеты ухватятся за это, то выставят Мистера Элсуорта посмешищем. Мы должны сейчас же остановить его, — сказал Коппел с болью в голосе. — Нет,— возразил доктор, — Если мы помешаем ему сейчас, все наши предыдущие достижения уйдут в пустую. Все трое, и особенно Свэйн, были крайне удивлены, узнав что «Деревья белом» стала участником Латроп шоу. К счастью, картину повесили в неприметном месте, где она не могла вызвать заметного любопытства. Однажды днём, Свэйн украдкой посетил галерею и когда увидел «Деревья белом», очень яркое и аляповатое пятно на стене, то покраснел до кончиков ушей. Как только два хихикающих студента остановились около этой чудной аномалии, Свэйн в ужасе ретировался. Услышать их оценку было выше его сил. Выставка продолжалась, и старик по-прежнему брал уроки, лишь изредка упоминая о своём участии в ней. Он пребывал в прекрасном настроении, что случалось нечасто. За два дня до закрытия выставки, специальный курьер принёс большой, выглядящий официально, конверт для мистера Элсуорта. Свэйн, Коппел и доктор в тот момент были в комнате. — Прочитайте мне что там, — попросил старик, — Мои глаза устали от рисования. «Галерея Латроп с радостью сообщает, что главный приз в номинации ландшафт в размере 1000 долларов был присуждён Колису П. Элсуорту — за его работу «Деревья в белом». Свэйн и Коппел разразились серией нечленораздельных звуков. Доктор Касвел, с большим трудом вспомнив о своём профессиональном самоконтроле, произнёс: — Поздравляю, Мистер Элсуорт, Отлично, отлично… Видите же… Конечно, я не ожидал такой великолепной новости. Но, но — хорошо, сейчас, вы должны признать, что искусство даёт удовлетворение гораздо более сильное, чем бизнес. — Забудь об искусстве!— отрезал старик, — Я купил галерею Латроп в прошлом месяце.

</poem> </spoiler>

можно тут комментировать если удобнее

Discussion

Yuri ScherbakovYuri Scherbakov, 2015/02/04 09:22, 2015/02/04 09:23

“I've thought of that, too. I can get a student from one of the art schools to come here once a week and show you.”
Doctor Caswell went to his friend, Judson Livingston, head of the Atlantic Art Institute, and explained the situation. — Я об этом позаботился. Найму студента из какой-нибудь художественной школы, чтобы он приходил раз в неделю и показывал вам, как это делается. Доктор Кесвел обратился за помощью к своему другу Джудсону Ливингстону, который возглавлял Атлантический Художественный Институт.

отредактировать выделенное жирным


Livingston had just the young man — Frank Swain, eighteen years old and a promising student. He needed the money. Ran an elevator at night to pay tuition. How much would he get? Five dollars a visit. Fine.
Ливингстон как раз имел на примете молодого студента, которого звали Фрэнк Свэйн. Ему было восемнадцать, он был талантлив, но небогат и вынужден был по вечерам работать лифтёром, чтобы оплачивать учёбу. Сколько же ему платить? Пять долларов за визит. Отлично.

довести до 4-го уровня эквивалентности

Vitali SolomeinVitali Solomein, 2015/02/04 12:34, 2015/02/04 12:39

“I've thought of that, too. I can get a student from one of the art schools to come here once a week and show you.” Doctor Caswell went to his friend, Judson Livingston, head of the Atlantic Art Institute, and explained the situation.
Это я тоже предусмотрел. Могу нанять молодого художника - студента, чтобы он приходил раз в неделю и обучал вас. Доктор Кесвел обратился за помощью к своему другу Джудсону Ливингстону, который возглавлял Художественный Институт Атлантики.

Может Atlantic вообще не надо переводить? Оставить “Атлантик Арт Инститьют”


Livingston had just the young man — Frank Swain, eighteen years old and a promising student. He needed the money. Ran an elevator at night to pay tuition. How much would he get? Five dollars a visit. Fine.
У Ливингстона как раз был молодой студент - Фрэнк Свэйн, восемнадцатилетний и многообещающий. Он нуждался в деньгах и вечерами подрабатывал лифтёром, чтобы оплачивать учёбу. Сколько бы он хотел получать? Пять долларов за визит. Отлично.

Yuri ScherbakovYuri Scherbakov, 2015/02/04 13:40
Оставить “Атлантик Арт Инститьют”

Атлантик - верно, а Арт Инститьют - перевести

Это я тоже предусмотрел.

глагол в прошедшем времени, а нужно в настоящем или глагол состояния а глагольную семантику передать именной частью составного сказуемого

У Ливингстона как раз был молодой студент

в смысле “был”?

молодой студент - Фрэнк Свэйн, восемнадцатилетний и многообещающий

перераспредели определения более линейно

Он нуждался в деньгах и вечерами подрабатывал лифтёром, чтобы оплачивать учёбу.

поменяй местами тему рему

Vitali SolomeinVitali Solomein, 2015/02/15 08:50, 2015/02/15 08:51

Согласованный отрывок

3 абзац

“I don't mean seriously,” said the doctor, relieved that disaster had been averted. “Just fool around with chalk and crayons. It'll be fun.”
“Bosh!”
“All right.” The doctor stood up. “I just suggested it, that's all.”
“But, Caswell, how do I start playing with the chalk — that is, if I'm foolish enough to start?”
“I've thought of that, too. I can get a student from one of the art schools to come here once a week and show you.”

Поняв, что его опасения были напрасны, доктор продолжил:
— Ну… ни как настоящий художник. Только немного порисовать … Мелками, карандашами. Будет интересно!
— Бред!
— Ладно,— доктор встал, — Это всего лишь предложение.
— Но, Касвел, как же мне порисовать-то, если я и карандаш-то в руке держать не умею?
— Так и на этот случай у меня мысль есть. Одного раза в неделю вам будет достаточно, чтобы этому научится у любого студента из любой художественной школы.

4 абзац

Doctor Caswell went to his friend, Judson Livingston, head of the Atlantic Art Institute, and explained the situation. Livingston had just the young man — Frank Swain, eighteen years old and a promising student. He needed the money. Ran an elevator at night to pay tuition. How much would he get? Five dollars a visit. Fine.

Доктор Кесвел обратился за помощью к своему другу Джудсону Ливингстону, который возглавлял Художественную школу Атлантик-арт. Ливингстон посоветовал Фрэнка Свэйна, восемнадцатилетнего талантливого студента, который вечерами подрабатывал лифтёром, чтобы оплачивать обучение. Сколько ему будут платить? Пять долларов за урок. Отлично.

Новый отрывок текста

5 абзац (с разбивкой по предложениям)

(1) Next afternoon young Swain was shown into the big living room.
(2) Collis P. Ellsworth looked at him appraisingly.
(3) “Sir, I'm not an artist yet,” answered the young man.
(4) “Umph?”
(5) Swain arranged some paper and crayons on the table.
(5) “Let's try and draw that vase over there on the mantelpiece,” he suggested.
(6) “Try it, Mister Ellsworth, please.”
(7) “Umph!”
(8) The old man took a piece of crayon in a shaky hand and made a scrawl.
(9) He made another scrawl and connected the two with a couple of crude lines.
(10) “There it is, young man,” he snapped with a grunt of satisfaction.
(11) “Such foolishness. Poppycock!”
(12) Frank Swain was patient.
(13) He needed the five dollars.
(14) “If you want to draw you will have to look at what you're drawing, sir.”
(15) Old Ellsworth squinted and looked.
(16) “By gum, it's kinda pretty, I never noticed it before.”

На следующий день, после полудня, Коллис П. Элсуорт принял Свэйна в роскошной гостиной.
— Сэр, я сам ещё учусь. — предупредил молодой человек, ощутив на себе недоверчивый взгляд хозяина.
— И?
Разложив на столе бумагу и мелки, Свэйн предложил:
— Давайте нарисуем вон ту вазу на каминной полке. Будьте добры, мистер Элсуорд, попробуйте.
— Хм…
Старик взял мелок дрожащей рукой и нарисовал кривую линию. Затем ещё одну и соединил их парой небрежных отрезков.
— Вот, молодой человек, получите! — резко, с удовлетворением, сказал он – Чушь какая-то. Ерунда!
Фрэнк Свэйн не сдавался. Пять долларов на дороге не валялись.
— У вас получится нарисовать, если смотреть на то, что вы рисуете, сэр.
Старик Элсуорт поднял глаза и пригляделся к вазе:
— Бог мой, я никогда не замечал, как она прекрасна.

You could leave a comment if you were logged in.
translating/blog/2015-02-03-073705.txt · Last modified: 2018/04/22 23:27 (external edit)